Mastering Holistic Sales

WITH

Santa Victorio

The Limitless Podcast

Mastering Holistic Sales

with Santa Victorio

0:00
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Are you tired of customer objections? Do you feel like your sales cycle isn’t giving you results fast enough?

People fail in sales due to the lack of 2 things: strategy and mindset.

Holistic sales coach Santa Victorio creates holistic results, helping people develop and refine their sales strategy and mindset in order to achieve their sales goals with confidence like they’ve never had before.

Many people have said that sales is an evil profession, but Santa’s goal is to bring back the good reputation of sales by reminding people that it isn’t just about money, but it’s more about adding value to people’s lives and helping them solve their problems.

"If you're doing sales from a place of integrity, you're actually offering to help someone."

- Santa Victorio
@LimitlessShow @franklyco_

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IN THIS EPISODE YOU WILL LEARN

  • How to overcome customer objections.

  • How to shorten your sales cycle by no longer going back and forth in proposals but instead, close the sale right away.

  • How to develop a sales mindset built around confidence and willingness to help your customers.

  • How to trust your product or service and talk about price without hesitation.

LINKS FROM THIS EPISODE

Johanna Buchweitz:
How would you feel if time and money were no object? Or if you always knew that the answers you sought were at your fingertips? Or that the creative spark you would need for the next project was always going to be there. You would feel limitless. I’m Johanna Buchweitz and it’s my honor to welcome all of you to Limitless, the show, where we have open, honest, direct communication with extraordinary women in business to provide you with actual next steps for super growth based on their proven success tactics. Joining me on today’s episode is Santa Victoria, a Holistic Sales Coach. She helps heart centered professionals create an equally rewarding business in life. She has worked with everyone from sales leaders at leading tech companies to founders at Innovative startups to professionals with a side hustle. Her expertise comes from being a multiple million dollar sales professional in New York City.
Coach training also by an ICF accredited program and a self-directed education on mindset. Santa, welcome to Limitless.

Santa Victorio:
Hi Johanna, so nice to be here. Thanks for having me.

Johanna Buchweitz:
I’m so excited to have you here. And I love this topic because, like, sales is just it’s awesome. It’s like a big one to tackle and I’m super excited for everything we’re going to talk about today. To kick off the show, I love to ask all of my guests my number one most favorite question ever that stems from this belief that I have that all driven female entrepreneurs are modern day superheroes. So as a superhero entrepreneur, you are. What’s your superpower?

Santa Victorio:
Great question. My superpower is to be idealistic. Paired with resilience and a little bit of charisma, which I can’t take credit for. I was blessed with that and to impart it with the people that I touch.

Johanna Buchweitz:
I love that. So when you say you’re a holistic sales coach, for anyone who is listening, who might not be familiar with what that term really means, like, could you explain that to us a little bit? Like what is a holistic sales coach?

Santa Victorio:
Yeah, so holistic in this sense means a holistic approach. So not just looking at mindset, but also looking at strategy, looking at personal transformation in hopes of creating holistic results. So results in your sales, in your business and your operations and your personal life across the spectrum. And the idea is that when we create transformation on one level, it ripples out into other areas of your life. So a breakthrough in confidence is not only going to impact your sales performance, but it’s also going to impact how you show up in relationships, how much crap you take from other people, you know. So it touches so many different areas of life. So it’s a holistic approach in hopes of holistic results.

Johanna Buchweitz:
I love that. That is awesome. So what is your approach when you go into sales coaching?

Santa Victorio:
My approach, number one, which might be a little different from other sales coach that we do not touch strategy for an entire month of working together. And I have become very good at keeping my clients patient and having them see the outcomes that come from working specifically on personal transformation and mindset. And the reason why I say to keep people patient is because we live in a strategy based society where we have nothing short of strategy.
It’s everywhere. You can find it on the palm of your hands. But what stops a lot of us from implementing the strategy is usually our mindset, or we don’t know which strategy to use, or we don’t know what our vision is, which then feeds into not knowing what strategy to use. So my approach is to spend the first month completely looking at mindset and vision.
So we’re going to, number one, look at what’s your northstar, your future vision, the thing you want to create, the thing that’s always going to pull us there when we’re in the trenches. And then we look at what’s something that’s stopping you, which I’ve heard so many of your podcasts, which wow, so many powerful women you have on here. And that seems to be a current consistent theme, is what’s holding you back from the thing that you want. So in this first month, we dive deeply into that and we blast it out of the way and from that place it’s much easier to identify what’s the correct strategy for your goals and how to be resilient with that strategy.

Johanna Buchweitz:
I love that because I think it’s so true that so much of the success in our business and our life really can be attributed to mindset. And most of us don’t want to consider that as an option at first because we think of everything else, right? We’re like, Oh, it’s our strategy, it’s our intelligence. We need to take one more course. We need to learn one more thing, whatever it may be. But when we actually take the time to focus on the way we think, it’s almost like shocking what kind of transformation happens all around us. And I think that’s so cool that you take that approach. Like when you’re diving into sales coaching. Do you find that you get a lot of pushback at first or, like, do a lot of your clients say like, Oh, I thought this was sales coaching?
I get that we’re going to figure out how I can hit like, you know, specific number in sales. What are you talking about? Limiting beliefs. What are you talking about mindset?

Santa Victorio:
Yes, I definitely get that, especially from people who are coming from the corporate arena, because it’s all about strategies, all about output, results yesterday. So I get that a lot from that subset of people. And of course I use my sales skills to sell them on the reason that we’re doing it with this approach. And I love what you said before about how mindset makes such a big difference. And when you were talking about that, it made me think of an analogy I use with a lot of my clients, which is like kicking a soccer ball. So when you kick a soccer ball and I don’t know how familiar everyone is with how to kick a soccer ball and the mechanisms of kicking a soccer ball. But the general idea is your non kicking foot sits next to the soccer ball and it points in the direction of where you want to kick and then your kicking foot swings through the ball and kicks it and it goes according to where the non kicking foot is and the non kicking foot is like the mindset. So it’s pointing us in the direction of where we want to go, whereas the strategy is the kicking foot which actually powers the ball forward. So we can’t have one without the other. You know, and I think this is where there’s a lot of failure with sales is either someone has great strategy but terrible mindset or they have all the mindset in the world, but they’re not following through on the strategy and the action. So you need a balance of both of them, which is really why I hone in on the holistic aspect.

Johanna Buchweitz:
So for anyone who’s listening right now who might be new to this concept of like the the power that happens and the magic of the results that occur, when you combine mindset with strategy, what would you say to that? I’m like, you know, when you get those pushback from like from your clients, like, you know, anyone who’s listening right now who’s like tried to give you that pushback to like, what’s something that you can tell them to help them really understand the value of doing that mindset work and the amazing effects that it really will have on their sales.

Santa Victorio:
So it depends on what level of spiciness they want. So, you know, I’ll say, what do you what do you want? One, two or three level of spiciness, mild, medium or hot? And, you know, if they say mild, you know, like, okay, now say a meandering way to really tell them the value if they’re okay with medium, I’ll say, okay, we’re throwing spaghetti at the wall when we don’t have mindset, when we don’t have direction, we’re not precise. If they want the front door and we’re like, look, you came to me for help. You haven’t been getting the results you wanted to get. So you need to trust the process here. The reason that you haven’t been doing well is because you’re missing out on this mindset piece. So depending on the level of spiciness they want is how I meet them. But usually after one or two times of back and forth they are on board with it because they do see results. And I think one thing is that people feel good when they find a mindset blockage and they remove that mindset blockage like they don’t even care if it applies to sales. They’re like I just feel better. So it was worth the coaching for that alone.

Johanna Buchweitz:
I love that and I love the spicy approach too, because I’m all about like open, honest and being super direct. So like, for me at least, like, I love somebody, just tell me how it is. And it’s true because I think sometimes we shut things down before even trying them. And it’s helpful to remember that like you showed up, let’s say, to coaching, you listen to a podcast, you took like an online course for a reason because you want something to change. You don’t want to continue having the same results that you’re currently having. You’re looking for a shift. And if you continue doing the same things you were always doing, you’re going to continue getting the same results. And so by trying something new, even if it feels a little bit funky, even if it’s like kind of goes against everything you think is true, if you can at least have a tiny bit of openness going into it and try it, learn it and apply it. And then after doing all that, if you decide it’s not for you, fine. But like if you even just can measure a tiny bit of results no matter what it is, it doesn’t have to be like all of a sudden you go from like $2 in sales to 2 billion in a day. We’re not talking that crazy, but what if you go from $2 to $10 and I know we’re talking small numbers here, everyone’s like, Girl, I don’t want to have $2 of sales. What are you talking about? That sounds horrible. But you guys get what I’m saying. Like, try it measured a little bit results even at their baby steps and you’ll be surprised at all the magic that kind of unfolds after.

Santa Victorio:
Yeah, I love that you say that. Thank you for saying that because it reminds me that measurement is a very important part in coaching and like it’s so normal to me that I forget to even talk about it. But one thing that I do to help people see the practicality of what we talk about is I always ask them, okay, what are you going to do with this awareness now that we see that you have a relationship to money that’s kind of faulty and holding you back in your sales?
What can we do today to get one step closer to your goal? So it’s always bringing it back to something that’s applicable so that we can measure progress because that is so important in adult learning and just for people in general to be able to measure how they are succeeding.

Johanna Buchweitz:
Yeah, for sure. And I love data points too. So for me that’s always the important thing to have because it also puts it into perspective because sometimes we think that there’s no results. But then if we actually, like, look at it like you’ll see that there are some results, even if they’re not as, like, mind blowing, headline making as we might dream of, but baby steps, like slowly climbing up the ladder soon enough, you’ll get those, like, headline making sales numbers.

Santa Victorio:
And that’s the beauty of a coach. We reflect back to you the results because left to our own devices, it’s hard to see our wins. But with a coach to tell us, Hey, you know, that you were at point C and now you’re up point F, congratulations. That’s huge progress.

Johanna Buchweitz:
Yeah, no, for sure. I love that. So one thing that I found with, like, so many female entrepreneurs is they want to get better at sales, but sales is so scary. It’s, like, almost like it makes you nauseous. Like, you don’t know what to do with it. It’s this big, huge thing that you know you need to be really good at. But something about it just seems so terrifying. Now, with all the people that you’ve worked with, like, is there a commonality or a common reason, like why that is? Like, why is sales so scary at least from, like this, like psychological standpoint?

Santa Victorio:
Yeah, there’s two reasons I can think of. So number one is the societal narrative that we have about sales, that it’s an evil profession, which by the way, I would love to reframe that and to restore the reputation of sales, because if you do it from a place of integrity, what you’re actually doing is offering to help someone. Can you imagine someone’s house is on fire and then you offer them a fire hose or you offer to call the fire department for that. You just help them out so much. And there are so many people who need our product or service or solution, but we’re not willing to give it to them because we’re too afraid to sell.
And the reason we’re too afraid to sell, to go back to your question is, yeah, we have all of these stereotypes about salespeople. We have the pushy car salesperson, we have the Wolf of Wall Street who’s not ethical, who by the way, I still love that story. It’s such a fun story. If you can see it as a story and not what every salesperson is. You know, we have always be closing. So this narrative around sales makes it really scary, number one. Number two is that sales is essentially public speaking but to one person, you know, you’re giving not a monologue, but you’re communicating and you have to hold space for someone for a long time and persuade them to take your solution. And public speaking is scary for people. I think there’s a joke in Seinfeld that says, like, people rather be in the casket than giving the eulogy at a funeral, meaning people rather die than public speak. So the same goes with sales. It’s a very scary experience if you haven’t mastered the skill and if you don’t know what you’re doing because you’re very vulnerable in that job function.

Johanna Buchweitz:
So how do you start to shift that?

Santa Victorio:
So we do two things. Number one, we identified the story that someone has around sales. And number two, we build the skill to sell. So with the story, each person has a different relationship to sales and in that relationship is probably included relationship to money because sales is an exchange of money and then relationship to business like what did you see your parents do growing up? How did they treat work? So you bring a little bit of that in to your demeanor with business and then relationship to yourself as a salesperson. Like how do you see yourself? Do you see yourself as a competent solutions provider? Do you see yourself as confident? Do you see yourself as equal to your clients or hopefully not superior, inferior? We’re looking for equality between you and your client. So we look at that sales story, number one, and I have an exercise where like I ask you 15 questions to really get you to the bottom of it. And then we look at the impact of that sales story. So if your sales story indicates, okay, I don’t really like to have a lot of money or I don’t like to ask for a lot of money because I feel gross. I don’t really trust other people in business. I think just business is gross altogether and I see it as a necessary evil. Then I take people through an exercise where we look at the costs and benefits analysis of these thoughts, and then we try to reframe it and we create a plan from that place of reframing. So that’s the first thing that we do. So we get really nitty gritty on the story. Number two, we build the sales skills. So I take my clients through an assessment where I look at their entire sales process. We do a role playing together and I tell them the things that they can do well or that they do well in and the things that they need to improve in. And then we make a very comprehensive plan from there. Okay, I see your sales process is way too long and you’re losing a lot of sales at point A, B, and C. Here’s what we need to do to truncate this. Here’s what you need to believe in order to actually follow through on this. I also notice that in your role playing, you say “um” a little bit too much, which I’m totally doing on this podcast, my bad.
And here’s a tactic that you can use to overcome using so many filler words. So it’s really dependent. But the overall framework is assessing where the person is without judgment and then creating a plan for them.

Johanna Buchweitz:
So when it comes to an actual strategy or an actual sales plan, like after you go through the whole mindset work, is it different for each person dependent on the business or the industry they’re in? Or is there at least like a side of like best practices or like something like along those lines? That’s more general, but like anyone who’s listening right now can actually start trying and applying for their own business?

Santa Victorio:
Yes, 100%. Thank you for asking that. So it is individual, but I can give you some best practices. So a number one best practice that I see, especially with women, is to create a short sales cycle. And so the shorter your sales cycle is, the more likely you are to succeed in the sale. And the sales cycle means from interest of the person saying they want to work with you until they actually sign the paperwork. They put money. There’s money in your bank account. That’s a sales cycle. And a lot of women I work with, I notice that they make the sales cycle too long. They add extra steps. So, for example, instead of having just one sales meeting and asking for the close, they say, okay, we have one sales meeting. What I’m going to do is I’m going to send you a proposal. And then after the proposal, I’m going to meet with your management team and then after your management team, I’m going to send you another proposal. So I always try to rein that in a little bit because number one, it saves them time. And number two, the longer the sales cycle, the more it simmers out. So I teach people, okay, we don’t need a proposal, let’s just ask them for commitment on the sales call. And I think this is my number two piece of advice is ask for commitment on the sales call because I thought this was normal every day knowledge. But now that I’ve worked with several people, I see that it’s not. And a lot of people we don’t ask for commitment on the sales call because we’re too afraid to talk about the logistics of what it takes to work together or too afraid to talk about price, afraid to talk about implementation, and we don’t know how to handle objections. So I would recommend for anyone to learn how to do those things. Do Whatever you need to do to be confident, to talk about price and implementation on the call and do it. Come hell or high water. Do it because it will save you so much time. And a great book that I have for that is by a woman called Wendy Weiss. And it’s called Cold Calling for Women. And even if you’re not cold calling, it has a lot of tidbits in there about how to approach business in a more effective way. So I would highly recommend it.

Johanna Buchweitz:
So when you talk about shortening the sales process, right, so what would that look like, let’s say, for someone who’s doing coaching? So like when you said like one sales call, is that like let’s say someone who has on their website like book a 45 minute like free strategy call or something like that. And on that call, basically decide whether or not you’re going to work together?

Santa Victorio:
Yes. So that can be one way and then there’s other ways to to truncate the sales process. So you can also just make it easy for the client to sign up. So let’s say we take the sales call. They say yes, but I need to look at a few things before I can give full commitment. Then you say, okay, well here in one email is everything that you need to start with me and try to make this as simple as possible. I just need you to sign this contract and to do this invoice and to tell me when we can talk, rather than I need you to, like, fill out this form that’s super long. I need you to do X, Y and z. Just make it simple for people to buy. That’s one way and then another way on the front end. So if we go before the sales call is to minimize back and forth, which is one place I see a lot of people fail in their sales cycle is just way too much email back and forth. No, put all of that in one email. Get a calendly link like optimize that part and you will save yourself so much headache.

Johanna Buchweitz:
When you talk about like on the actual call, like bringing up price, how does that conversation go? Like at what point do you bring that up and how do you teach people to start, feel confident, do so? Is there like a flow that they should go into, like from the beginning of the call, middle to the end?

Santa Victorio:
Yes, I have a flow. I can share it. I can also talk about how to make people feel confident. I’m going to give you a high level and then I’ll dive deeply. So there’s a few different parts to a sales call. So there’s, number one, the introduction where you just get in a relationship, you build rapport. We feel good, we talk about the weather. Number two is qualifying. So this is where you ask questions to gather information on your prospect so that you can use it to talk about it when you talk about your solution and you go into the presentation, another key part of this is you actually want to make sure that they’re a good fit for you and that you’re a good fit for them.
This is a match. You don’t just take anyone. So that’s the number part of the number two part. And a great quote for this section of the sales call is actually by the Wolf of Wall Street and Jordan Belfort. He says that you are a sorter, not an alchemist, meaning you want to find people who are ready to buy from you, who fit your customer profile. You don’t want to turn non buyers into buyers. So this is the part of the call where you’re going to suss out and see if they actually are a good fit for you. And then if they are qualified, you’re going to transition into talking about your solution that you transition for that. Is based off what you told me I think that we could really help you with our solution. And then you take all the information that they told you in the qualifying section and you apply that to your presentation. Hey, Mr. Client. Hey, Mrs. Client, I know you said it’s important to move really quickly in this project, and that’s exactly why we have this technology to get you from point A to Z in less time than our competitors.
So you speak to what they told you, and the presentation feels even more customized to them. And then after that, you ask them two magical questions to get the price to come up. And so first you say, how does that sound? The reason you say, how does that sound is because you want to just hear people’s general feedback and because we have something called a politeness barrier where we don’t like to give constructive feedback generally unless we give something nice ahead of time. You know, we’ve been conditioned to be nice. I know some people love to be direct, but a lot of people are conditioned to be nice. So you give them the opportunity to be nice and then you say, Great, do you have any objections for moving forward? So you’re asking for the sale. And with that, you know, usually they’ll say, Yeah, what’s the price? Or I’m not really sure about X, Y or Z. So you answer those questions, you handle the objections, but there’s always a price question and you could do another way too. You could just tell them the price. Like in the presentation, you can say, okay, we can do all of this for a fair price or a fair investment of X, Y and Z.
And then you can ask them, how does it feel? But even if you forget to say the price and just say, What are your objections? And then they’ll usually say, Oh, I’m ready to move forward, but I’m just not sure how much it would cost me. And then you tell them, and then you go back in and you say, okay, so shall we move forward?
So that’s a really easy flow to follow and it gives you the opportunity to bring up their objections proactively, because if you don’t, one thing that happens is a lot of people give you something called a counterfeit. Yes, they say yes, but they mean no because they want to be polite. So by asking them directly what’s in the way of us moving forward together gets that out of the way completely. And if they lie to you, you don’t want to work with them. So it’s a great mechanism.

Johanna Buchweitz:
I love that. I think that’s such great advice because I think anyone who’s listening right now would say, Oh, what are your objections? They probably took like a deep inhale in and like hold their breath for a second. They’re like, Wait, what do you mean? I have to ask somebody why they don’t want to buy from me? And I think it’s so important because it’s like true.
Like you address it straight off the bat, you, you find out what’s holding them back. And to your point, it also – that goes back to what you said. Like it will shorten the sales process because if they give you that counterfeit, yes, you’re going to be following that lead for so long, having all that back and forth communication. And you won’t even know what they’re thinking. By asking, hopefully they give you mostly honest answer and you can either say, Yes, I can address these things and help you, or No, like it doesn’t make sense for us to work together. But either way, like you’re shorting the sales process just from that because you know, whether or not it’s going make sense to continue.

Santa Victorio:
Yes! Thank you for saying that. And I realize in you’re saying that I didn’t answer your second question, which was how do I make people feel confident in saying that? And I think it’s exactly what you said it’s just reminding them, hey, you’re going to save a lot of time and a lot of frustration. And also, we’re changing people’s personality almost at a core with this type of stuff like I’m teaching women how to be more confident, how to stand up for what they deserve in business. So it becomes easier with practice. Like the first few times it’s going to feel like you’re learning how to walk, but after a few times it becomes second nature. Hey, what objections do you have? Like, are you working with me or not? You know, so it becomes much easier over time.

Johanna Buchweitz:
Yeah. And I would also think that, like, it’s really helpful to even ask that just for yourself. Like it. I’m going to definitely, like, apply those for me and, like, share it with other people that I know to see how it works. But I think the way I automatically think about it is like this is a really cool learning opportunity. How can I have fun asking this question and take, like, the fear out of it? Right? And it’s like by asking this question, I also can learn because maybe I’m not realizing the way I’m communicating whatever it is I’m trying to sell. There’s some disconnect. If someone tells me that they have an objection and then the next person tells me they have a similar objection, it’s like, Oh, like I can just adjust this head on. Like I just learned so much and I can adjust, like, how I’m communicating my value just based off of, like, asking that question and getting your honest answer. Like, thank you so much for telling me that. I appreciate it. Like I and you know, like for me, it’s like anyone who says that, it’s like, oh, I just learned so much from you, even if we don’t work together. Thank you so much for sharing your objection.

Santa Victorio:
It’s a great data point. And then you can also do another strategy, which is to say an objection proactively. So for example, let’s say I’m a coach and I really am a coach, not as for example, but let’s say, for example, I get an objection often that it’s too expensive, which is, you know, depending on who I talk to, that is something that I get. And I could proactively say, okay, so my price is X, Y and Z, which I know might sound expensive off the bat, but I guarantee that you’re going to make that ten times back over the course of the next two years. And in the course of our contract, you’re going to make that back fully. So I get ahead of the objection so that I can already reframe their mind before I get to the closing question.
Because the longer the objection sits, it kind of marinates. So you want to address it as quick as possible. And as you said, yes, it’s a great data point. You learn so much about how you’re communicating, how your offer sounds. It’s super important data.

Johanna Buchweitz:
So to that point, when you say, okay, your price as a coach is, let’s say, super expensive, like I want to talk about that a little bit more because I think some people, if they have a price that they feel is, let’s say, affordable, like they’re like, okay, I can sell this. I feel comfortable sometimes they’re lowering their price to the point that they’re way underselling their value and they should be charging more just because it feels like, Oh, I can communicate this better and it’ll be more comfortable for someone to accept. So they think that maybe they’ll get more sales that way. So for anyone who is more premium or charging more for their product or service, like how can they think about that? Right, because you have all these different ranges like whether you’re doing coaching or whether like, you know, there’s always like masterminds where you hear like it’s like a $10,000 ticket. It’s like, how do you sell that? Like, how do you feel comfortable sharing that value without feeling like, Oh my God, this person’s going to ask me the price, and I have to tell them how expensive it is. Like I don’t even know what to do. They’re like, they’re going to be like, Nope, I’m out, hang up.

Santa Victorio:
That’s a great question. So you have to sell yourself on your price because if you’re not sold on your price, then it will leak out. And how you deliver your price and you probably have a similar people would have a similar reaction to what you just said. Like, Oh my God, I have to tell them my price. Deep inhale. Come on. You got it. But if you truly believe in your price, then that experience happens less. And so how do you sell yourself on your price is like you literally. You look at what you offer and you ask yourself, what is it worth for this person to create these type of results that they will make in my program?
Which, by the way, it’s priceless. Honestly, personal transformation is priceless. Another angle that I hit it at is sufficiency. So meaning that there’s more than enough money in the world and in this person’s world for them to afford this program. But what I mean by this is I always think of how much does someone make in a lifetime? So I think like the average person makes like, I don’t know, 2 to 4 million in their lifetime. I don’t know if that’s right. I have it written down somewhere, but it’s a large sum of money and okay, I’m going to charge them $10,000 out of the $4 million they’re going to make in their lifetime. And they’re going to get back so much more than the $10,000. Like of course it’s valuable. It’s a no brainer. So you really want to get to a place where your price feels like a no brainer. And sometimes it takes a little bit of back end negotiation with ourselves to really look at what we’re offering and to believe in that value. And like I literally for my coaching program, I have a document of all the different elements of my coaching program, the time, the date, what we talk about.
And I have reasons under each element why it is amazing that it’s set up this way. I love that it’s a one on one container because this really helps people get deep personal support. I love that it’s four months because it usually takes people at least three months to get transformation, and I want to make sure that they have an extra month to maintain it.
So really going through each element and obviously price is the biggest one because that’s where a lot of us get stuck and selling ourself on it, like maybe even having it like on your screen when you’re doing the call so that you remind yourself and with practice it becomes easier. Of course, the first few times it’s going to stink, but with practice it’s much easier.

Johanna Buchweitz:
I love that and I think it’s true. Like at the end of the day, it’s like if you also can really detail the value that you’re providing, you can feel more comfortable with charging accordingly. So like, you know, really just even like, like you said, like writing it down and like going, I love how you did that for yourself and going into that deep detail because sometimes like the value is not like so obvious, right? Because we’re like, Oh, somebody else could give that to you too. It’s like, why would you would work with somebody versus a do-it-yourself. It’s like, sure, it would be cheaper, but what would happen if you actually worked with someone who’s an expert about what they do, like what? You know, sometimes, yeah. You might get the same results.
Usually not, but like one will take you forever and one will be much faster. One will be more pleasant, one will be less overwhelming. Like and so even just those things like those are quantifiable. I think a lot of us forget that and the time piece is so important as well as the skill set. So I love that you said that. How does someone know when they should give up on a prospect like especially if they really like this potential client, they’re like, I really want to work with them. I really want them to buy what I’m selling. I think they would be awesome. How do they know when it’s time to just be like no? Like I should stop spending my time and my energy chasing after someone who’s not ready and willing to buy?

Santa Victorio:
That’s a great question. So with that one, you set up your sales process to essentially guide the prospects through the process. And you have little signposts like, hey, I’ll hear back from you on Monday. If I don’t hear back from you on Monday, can I reach out to you on Wednesday? So you create these timetables that both you and the prospect agree on.
And if the prospect does not stick to what they agreed to, then that’s a big red flag. And, you know, maybe you can keep like a three strikes you’re out type of policy. But I think it’s really intuitive, though. You can I think you should create a system around it just so you’re not being nice to everyone. But essentially if someone is not holding up to what they said they would hold up to, then that’s a big red flag.
Also, people aren’t qualified, so this is why it’s super important to create a strict customer profile and say, okay, in order to work with us. These are the characteristics that they must have. And if they do not have these characteristics, then I’m not working with them. It’s that simple. Or I’ll even refer them to a competitor who is better suited to handle their needs.
So I think, yeah, those are the two things. They’re not sticking to their word, they’re not qualified. And also, if you just have an intuitive nudge like you need to use your judgment and if something is off, then I would just let them go. And one thing that I teach people a lot is the idea that your prospect is like an equal partner to you.
So if your prospect is an equal partner and you have to meet each other 50, 50 causie it’s an equal relationship, are they meeting you halfway or are they forcing you to come 80% the way most of the time? Or are you coming 60% of the way or 70% of the way? That can also be a big red flag. Or if they’re treating you like you’re just another service provider or you don’t matter.
Like these are all red flags and I guess three red flags are out.

Johanna Buchweitz:
I like that because I think that’s important because I think sometimes like you do get hung up on who you want to sell to, you like them or whatever it may be. Like you think that they would give you great business and you want to keep chasing them. But I like what you said, the fact that like you’re equal because that also takes away this idea that like you are at the feet of like the person you’re selling to, like they’re the one with all the power, like they’re being so generous to give you their money, like where, you know, if you have that equal idea of like the both of you are showing up and you’re both giving value like they will be giving you, you know, their money that they worked hard to earn and you will be giving them so much also in return. I love that. I think that’s such a helpful piece of advice and something all of us can really remember.
And it just completely changes the dynamic of the relationship with the prospect, you know, or anyone that you’re trying to work with. Yes.

Santa Victorio:
Thank you for highlighting that, because I think of many of us come in, we think that the prospect is superior and we’re like, yes, Mr. Prospect, no. Mr. Prospect, I’ll do whatever you want. Just give me your money. And the thing we have to remember is we are giving them so much value, like be grounded in what you’re offering them. And one thing I can say for this is I remember when I made one of my first sales and after the client told me, Thank you so much for selling me this because your solution really helped me out, took a lot of stress off my plate. You know, I don’t have to work until 9 p.m. every night. I can get off at 530 like every other person.
And remembering that at the end of the sales process, my client said Thank you, really helped me to see the value that I offer people so I’d offer that to everyone who’s listening. You are giving so much value to your clients and to your prospects. Don’t you forget it.

Johanna Buchweitz:
I love that. And if you don’t think you’re giving value, find a way that you can give more, you know, because you need to feel good about what you’re selling. Because if you don’t, you’re going to constantly feel super sick. It’s not fine to sell something that you don’t think is good or valuable. So that just definitely, I think is like the first step to make sure that the value is definitely there that you’re giving. So for anyone who’s listening who maybe is not selling a service or coaching or doesn’t have the opportunity to do those types of one on one calls or sales calls, what can they do instead? Like whether they’re selling a product or something, like a little bit different and don’t have access to directly have those, like, sales conversations with prospects like how should they think about sales? Like how, how can they approach it?

Santa Victorio:
So you’re talking about people who sell without a sales call. So like, for example, someone, okay, so number one, I think an ideal thing here, a universal idea here is to, number one, understand the needs of your prospect. So when you mention that, I imagine like someone selling TVs at an appliance store. So with that type of person, I would recommend like understand why they’re here. What are their drivers? What are they looking for? What do you have that can match their needs? Because that’s what sales is really. It’s an action game. I have a solution for your product. I would like to offer it to you. Or if you don’t even know that you have this problem yet, let me tell you why you have this problem and give you the solution.
So I would say, number one, understand what’s going on with them because it’s a partnership. Again, it’s not just what you have to offer, but it’s what they need and how they would get value out of the thing you have to offer. And then number two, I would just say, be honest, this is going to be for any person. Be honest in your sales with people. Don’t be the typical salesperson who just sees your prospects as a commission, especially in these type of sales that might be in person, because people can sense it. They can sense it in your non-verbals, it just leaks out if you see someone as a potential commission check. So those two things I would say understand the needs of your prospect and be honest, always.

Johanna Buchweitz:
So for someone who let’s say is selling like direct to consumer products and their direct sales channel, let’s say is online, how can they properly communicate that value, especially like, you know, if they’re mostly using social media or like, you know, something along those lines to reach their target customer like ads, how can they properly communicate that value and stand out among the sea of tired of content that’s kind of floating out there and that their target customer might be seeing?

Santa Victorio:
Okay, thank you for clarifying your question. I didn’t know if I was answering it correctly, but okay, that is.

Johanna Buchweitz:
Yeah, it’s good. I like that, though, because you just like the in person too. So now we’re getting like all avenues of sales. We got the coaching, we got that in person and now we’ve got like direct to consumer. So you added extra value without even knowing it.

Santa Victorio:
Good, thank you for saying that. My mind just went directly to my brother who used to sell electronics and I was like, What would I tell him? And that’s actually a great answer to your question, which is to think about the persona of your ideal client. So if you sell D to C product and you want to post on social think, who is my ideal customer?
What is he or she like? What are the books that they read? Where do they live? What’s going on in their mind? What keeps them up at night? And think about that person and then create your content to talk to that person. Hey person, I know that you stay up all night thinking about how you would just love to sleep better without so much light penetrating your room.

00:42:43:13 – 00:43:03:04
Santa Victorio:
This is why I came up with the most perfect sleep mask which will block all that out. And you can have the most perfect night of sleep so you can feel rested for your next day. So you’re really thinking about what is it that they’re facing and how can I speak to that problem that they’re facing?

Johanna Buchweitz:
I like that. So like, how long does it take to get that message across and start to build that trust, especially with with anything that’s online and going through social media because since there’s so much content out there, while your content, let’s say, is amazing, it does exactly as you said, and it speaks to exactly the target customer and that is addressing all their needs, but they’re seeing a ton of other things too.
So some I’m sure when they first hear content, they’re like, Yeah, you’re the only person who actually said it the way it needs to be said. Like, I’m sold, let me hang out with you like I’m buying your product, whatever it is, done. But then others, they might take a little bit more time. What would you suggest to continue to like nurturing that relationship and taking someone who maybe saw your content was like, okay, like, you know, piqued my interest but I don’t know to like nurturing that relationship and helping them become more comfortable and potentially become like customers over time. Because I think things can just get so lost, especially with social media, definitely.

Santa Victorio:
And so with that, I would just say to show up consistently because number one, we never know where someone is in their buying process. I’ve had people reach out to me and like, Wow, you haven’t been interacting with any of my stories. You haven’t like or commented on a single post, but you’re interested in being a part of my program. So it’s not for us to say where someone is in the sales process. And I’ve also had people on the other end of the spectrum who have reached out to me and said, Oh my gosh, I’m so interested, would love to work with you and recreate what you have. And then we get on the call and they’re no show, so we can’t really determine what we can do is we can continue to show up, add value, trust that people are getting what they need. And then something else you said jumped out at me, which made me want to say that what you have to say is perfect for your target audience. Meaning that there’s a saying called different strokes for different folks. How you say one thing might really resonate with someone, whereas your competitor might sound like nails on a chalkboard to them.
And this reminds me of one of my favorite coaches in the world who I follow and so many people are like, I cannot stand her voice. Like, her voice is the most annoying thing I’ve ever heard. And I’m like, Are you serious? This girl has helped me close like thousands upon thousands upon thousands of dollars. Like, how in the world can you say this about someone or about her? And it just goes to show that we each have a different interpretation and someone so just continue to show up authentically and consistently and your folks will be there for you and, you know, just do what you can to continue to show up powerfully.

Johanna Buchweitz:
I really like what you said about how we might not realize where someone is in the buying process. And I think that’s such a valuable piece of information. And again, it’s like one of these things that like a couple of things you said today, like, you know, you hear them and you’re like, oh, like, sounds like that. Like pretty obvious, but like, it’s not something that we think about.
We’re like, why is this common sense not so common for me? Like, because it’s true. Like, you have no idea because you’re just basing off of what you see. Like you said, the, like the comment thing engagement. Someone had mentioned to me that they were doing like LinkedIn marketing and they were like creating all this content on LinkedIn and like all of a sudden they were getting all these messages of people who were like, We love your stuff.
We just didn’t want to like it because everybody else sees that. We liked it on LinkedIn and we didn’t want people to know that like we were interested in this mindset work. We’re like trying to have a facade here that like, well, you know, we are, we’re like one type of way, but like we want to work with you and it’s like, Oh, okay, but like, I wouldn’t have known that because you didn’t even interact with anything that, you know, like was posted. And so if we can remember that, it’s like it’s also a game changer because now you’re like showing up knowing that you’re still adding value even if you can’t directly see it right away. Like I know by creating, you know, some specific piece of content, I’m helping somebody, I’m adding some sort of value. It might not directly benefit me today, but next week it might, next month it might. Next year it might. But if I’m truly value focused in general, it doesn’t matter because I might have helped somebody, even if they don’t decide to take a sale today. And I love that. Thank you for saying that. You were dropping so, so much like amazing advice here. I feel like I’m learning a ton and I’m excited.

Santa Victorio:
Oh my goodness. Thank you for saying that because like you said, I’m in sauce. And when you’re like in it, you don’t quite see how helpful it can be to show people. So thank you so much for saying that and what you said; I just wanted to bring up one more point based off of what you said, and that is that selling a lot of times it feels like we’re talking into a void.
Like, you know, we send an email, we put out a piece of content and we’re like, Hello, is anyone listening? Is anyone reading what I have to say and all you need is just a handful of people to respond: Wow, that was amazing. I want to work with you. I cannot tell you how many times I have sent seven emails unanswered or seven touch points unanswered in a tasteful way.
You know, not all in the same week, like over a span of a few weeks. And on the sixth or seventh email, someone says, Hey, I’ve been meaning to get back to you. Thank you so much for consistently following up with me or just continuously showing up online. The most random girl from high school who I thought hated me, but no, she wants to work with me.
So we just never know. And I totally acknowledge that it feels like we’re talking to no one but we never know who we’re talking to.

Johanna Buchweitz:
Yeah, that’s so true. So for you, like when you’re trying to get new clients, like where do you go? Like, you know, like because we talked about like the sales calls and stuff like that. But like, let’s say someone has no idea who you are and you’re looking to kind of expand your client pool. Like, what’s your approach? Where do you reach them and how do you do it?

Santa Victorio:
So I do a mixture of things, and I’m going to steal a concept from one of my favorite sales coaches. It’s not mine, but this lady called Stacie Bateman and she talks about, you just have to go out there and meet as many people as possible, whether it’s online or in person. And for me, I ask myself, okay, what’s the most pleasurable way to meet people?
And now that the world is open again, that’s definitely in person. So I go to events that are aligned with my interests. One of my first clients here in Luxembourg, they moved to Luxembourg half a year ago, and when I did, I went to an improv event and that’s how I met my first client here in Luxembourg. But everywhere else I meet online.
So I make a lot of Instagram reels. I post about my life daily, never knowing who it will touch. I go to networking events as well, asking for referrals, showing up powerfully, and I go to a lot of this is like maybe more specific for my niche, but I go to a lot of like startup accelerators, so I would have people think, okay, what is a strategic place for me to show up if I want to create some clients? So for me, showing up in the startup world is strategic because a lot of people need help in startups with their sales processes. So I would have people ask themselves, where can I show up and most likely meet people who need my help?

Johanna Buchweitz:
I like that. I think that’s great because, you know, it’s like showing up in all different places and it’s also a numbers game, right? So I love that. Like talking to everyone and you never know what might stick, but it’s also like beneficial for you and like you can enjoy it too during the process of, like, meeting cool new people, which I love. Does the sales process change if you’re not selling a product or service? But let’s say if you’re selling your own company, does it shift at all or is it more or less the same process ideas, especially when it comes to pitching?

Santa Victorio:
Yeah. So when you say selling your company, you’re not talking about like exiting, right? You’re talking about selling your product or service in your company. You just want to make sure I understand, you.

Johanna Buchweitz:
Know, actually exiting. So like, let’s say, you know, you decide like I love the work that I’ve done, but you know, let’s say I want to do something else or I’m ready to exit because I know someone also had I sent in this question to asking about this, so like if you are pitching prospect buyers, obviously like you need to have your deck and your evaluation and all that stuff.
But when it comes to the actual pitch and it comes to the conversation of selling the value of your company, selling the price and finding that buyer who the right fit is the conversation similar to yours if you were selling a product or service or does it have to change a bit?

Santa Victorio:
MM That’s such a great question and in the integrity of what I talk about, my sales process of being honest, I want to say I’ve never personally helped someone sell their company and exit their company, though I’ve helped many people pitch to investors and I can say the process is similar except for in like the actual structure, like you don’t ask the investors qualifying questions, it’s more of just one way communication and then they ask you questions.
But I imagine it would be the same process though. I don’t want to speak in an area where I’m not well versed and mislead people because that would be the worst.

Johanna Buchweitz:
Well, first of all, I totally appreciate that honesty. So I would love to then to like approach it from, like you said, like a pitching perspective for investors. So if someone is going into an investor meeting, like you said, like the structure will be different. They’ll have that pitch deck. But when they’re sharing the story and the value of their company, how would you suggest they approach it.

Santa Victorio:
Yeah. So a different flow with a sales deck than with a qualifying call. So you’re right that it’s completely different. So how you want to start off is with an overall narrative of what’s going on in your space. So for example, Uber has like one of the most famous sales decks and in their sales decks they talk about like, here’s what’s going on in the taxi space.
People aren’t getting taxis as easily it’s way too expensive or there’s not enough supply for the demand. So we’re painting a picture of what’s happening, what’s the problem? I have someone who I work with in sustainability and she creates a picture of what’s happening with sustainability. Climate change is a fact. It’s very serious. So talking about that and then we’re going to flow into the problem.
Why does it matter? Why do I care that so many people aren’t getting taxis or why do I care that the world is ending? Yeah, you have to spell it out and then you move into the solution and you say, okay, well here’s how you can solve this. And usually you need to like bring in some innovation which is foreshadowing to what your technology or your company can do.
But you say, okay, in order to solve this thing, here’s a plan that we need to take. Well, it just so happens that we have a solution that can help execute the plan. And then you talk about your solution. Why it’s the perfect solution for the problem and then going to build credibility around the solution. So you’re going to say, here’s why. Our solution is the best. You might appeal to the technology. You might appeal to the team, you might appeal to some advisors or some previous investors. So appealing to all of these different elements that make your solution not only the best from a functionality standpoint, but from a credibility standpoint. And then you talk about next steps and what you’re asking for. You know, you might talk about valuation and then you go in for the kill, essentially. What is it that you want and for how much? And then you ask for it. And so yeah, it’s definitely a different flow than a sales call.

Johanna Buchweitz:
Yeah. But you know, at the end of the day you are still like trying to convey that value and deliver that value. And some people will say yes and some people will say no. Reminder to anyone listening; Uber got a ton of “no’s” when they were pitching at first and there’s a lot of like very famous people who have said that it was like a huge mistake.
Gary Vaynerchuk is someone who talks about this all the time where he could buy the New York Jets right now if he actually said yes to contributing. I think it was like the first round of Uber so It was like $250,000 or something along those lines. And like Uber got a lot of “no’s” too. A lot of companies get a lot of no’s. So you might get some too. But if you can approach it the same way as even the sales process, but the client’s like some people be the right fit, some people will not be the right fit. And I’m going to go back to this because now my favorite thing, having that equal mindset of like, you’re equal with the person, you’re selling to, whether it’s a client, whether it’s an investor, whether it’s a buyer of your company. Like you are delivering value and they are giving you something in return for that value. So you guys are like literally like sharing value and like that’s how you guys should really think about it. I know I am. I think that’s awesome. Well, thank you, Santa for giving us so much to work with now. I love it. I can’t wait, like, to see everyone start to apply some of the tips that you shared with us today to their own business and see what kind of magic happens.

Santa Victorio:
Oh, thank you so much. It’s been a pleasure to be here and to share all of this with your listeners.

Johanna Buchweitz:
So before you go, as you’ve grown your coaching business over time and now you’ve moved to Luxembourg too, which I think is so cool, what does success mean to you?

Santa Victorio:
Such a delicious question because it’s changed over the years. Success used to mean business success being top performer in my sales job, which I did become, and then I realized, Oh, wow, the success doesn’t mean anything if I don’t love myself. So really, success is to feel inner peace and happiness. And when you feel inner peace and happiness, then everything else is just a bonus. And also everything else becomes much easier to create. There’s positive psychology studies that show actually your brain is 30% more productive when you’re happy and is more creative when you’re happy. So when you’re happy, it actually becomes easier to produce all these things that you want to produce. So I say happiness is the number one reason for success.

Johanna Buchweitz:
Oh, I love that. That is so good. So I know you’ve left us with like so many words of wisdom today, but last but not least before go. Could you please leave us with words of wisdom that can fit on a tweet?

Santa Victorio:
Thank you for saying that. Yes, I would love to leave you with one tweetable word of wisdom. And it is it’s better to cringe over the mistakes that you’ve made rather than crying over opportunities that you lost.

Johanna Buchweitz:
Love it. Thank you so much for coming on today.

Santa Victorio:
Thank you so much for having me on. It was such a pleasure to be with you and your listeners.

Johanna Buchweitz:
We hope you enjoyed hearing from the incredible Santa Victorio. And if you did, please leave us a review on Apple, Spotify or wherever you tune in to listen. Please share this episode with anyone who you think might enjoy it. Thank you so much for tuning in to this week’s episode of Limitless. See you next week for a new episode.

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