The Winning Power of Clarity

WITH

Kareen Zahr Walsh

The Limitless Podcast

The Winning Power of Clarity

with Kareen Zahr Walsh

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Most start-up businesses fail within two to five years. Ever wondered what their common mistake is? One word: Misalignment. They are not aligning the expertise they need to their business strategy. Business owners have to take a step back and check what is working, what they want to be doing more of, what isn’t working, what they want to be doing less of, what they want to start doing and what those action items are, so they can scale faster and more efficiently.

Kareen Zahr Walsh is a growth catalyst. She helps companies grow through revamping their strategies and aligning them with their business goals. She built her strategic growth consulting and advisory company, Revampologist, to help entrepreneurs align their people, processes, and technology under the right strategy and leadership to best scale their business with ease.

"Success is being able to stand in the truth of who I am in all that I do."

- Kareen Zahr Walsh
@LimitlessShow @franklyco_

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IN THIS EPISODE YOU WILL LEARN

  • How to be clear about what you want for your business, and how to strategically plan to achieve your business goals.

  • How to revamp your current practices and turn them into results-oriented action plans.

  • How to deal with the growing pains that come with building a business.

  • How to scale your company faster in a foolproof way.

LINKS FROM THIS EPISODE

Johanna Buckweitz:
How would you feel if time and money were no objects or if you always knew that the answers you saw were at your fingertips or that the creative sparks you would need for the next project was always going to be there? You would feel limitless. I’m Johanna Buchweitz, and it is my honor to welcome all of you to limitless the show where we have open, honest, and direct communication with extraordinary women in business to provide you with actionable next steps for super growth based on their proven success tactics. Joining me on today’s episode is Kareen Zahr Walsh, CEO and founder of Revampologist as seven figure boutique strategic growth consulting and advisory company. Kareen and her team help their clients get clarity on the vision for their business, build a strategy against it, and sources the team when needed to execute against that strategy. Kareen, welcome to Limitless.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
It’s so great to be here. Thank you for having me.

Johanna Buckweitz:
I’m excited to have you here. So to those of you who are tuning in for the first time, you’re gonna get used to this, and anyone who’s been here before you know the drill. Kareen, I like to kick off every single episode with this belief that I have that driven female entrepreneurs are truly modern-day superheroes. So as a superhero entrepreneur you are. What’s your superpower?

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
I’d like to say I bring clarity,

Johanna Buckweitz:
love it.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
I bring clarity, personal, professional, business, clarity to then execute against because without being clear, we, you know, are misstepping basically, and wasting time and money.

Johanna Buckweitz:
A hundred percent. So what inspired you to create your company?

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
It was a journey of my own self-discovery, I would say, on working in other people’s businesses. I’m sure you’ve had the same where you, you really like strive to be the best you can be in someone else’s container and then realize I kind of wanna lead the container and decide how I show up and who I show up for and, what I’m doing and why I’m doing it, and, that is what really introduced this version of my company today. It’s the ability to go in and out of environments and feel like I’m maximizing. What I’m able to bring to the table for, in my own business, but mainly for others cuz it’s a service-based business and keep growing at the pace I want to grow.

Johanna Buckweitz:
I love that. It’s like, you know, you, you at the end of the day like you’re your own boss and with that means that you get to take credit for all your successes and anything that doesn’t go as well, you get to. , take credit for that too, right? Like all of it is you, and that’s kind of what makes it pretty cool to, to run your own company. So you’ve worked with different size companies, right? Like you’ve worked with like companies that are huge, like a BlackRock, a Groupon, and a Broadridge. But you’ve also worked with startup companies. How does your approach change when the size of the company you’re working with changes?

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
It changes mainly with the budget. You can work with, so as you know, when, I like to say startups start to grow up, it’s generally. Because they’ve proven their model and now it’s time to really establish the right practices to scale and to grow. And so the different models that occur from a larger organization, which has, in my opinion, sometimes too much overhead and a lot of, resource waste, I generally go into those companies to help them streamline. and, do it more efficient efficiently. Whereas with, more of a startup organization, it’s to make sure they’re sustaining. Efficiently out the gate and not burning themselves out. Cuz I’m sure you’ve seen that too, where the hustle is real when the demand is high, and also you’re wanting to see such success but might not know all the different modalities of how to get it done and there could be an easier, faster more efficient way. So, it’s what we bring to the table when we’re working with that size company. But the frameworks are generally the. You know, business is business and you have the same modality of, of attraction, you know, selling your products, servicing those sales, and, the fulfillment side, and then the customer care and the experience that you wanna put out into the world and you repeat. So it’s not like it’s that different, it’s more about who’s making the decision and why are they making that decision and making sure they’re clear about why you know they’re going after it.

Johanna Buckweitz:
I love that you said the word efficiency quite a few times because it’s one of my favorite words ever. and anyone who knows me knows that I love to like find ways to create more efficient processes like anywhere. What are your top three favorite ways to create something to be more efficient, especially within a startup?

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
So in the startup space, it’s really, you know, I was an agile coach for many years and so a lot of my practices come from an agile framework where you’re consistently checking in on how it’s going and tweaking as you go and that’s what retrospectives are for. so it’s one of the first things I actually go into companies and apply. Across any area of their business. We do a retrospective because if we’re not gathering the feedback across the team that’s actually delivering it and in the weeds, so to say, right, then we can’t make it more efficient and, you know, have you ever been through a retrospective exercise? Do you know what I’m talking about?

Johanna Buckweitz:
I have not.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
Okay. So, what’s really great is that it’s just four simple questions and I share this and I think it’s one of the things you can download off my website. So if anyone wants to get one of the worksheets, it’s a retrospective worksheet and you can apply this. It’s also in my book Lead With Value because it’s one of the top exercises I do in order to get clarity on like, where are we right now and where do we need. And you can do it literally when you’re in the thick of things on a weekly basis if you want so that every week you’re slowly refining and becoming more efficient into what you do so the four questions real quick, it’s the the first one is, what are some of the things we’ve done really well that we wanna celebrate? Because you wanna keep doing them, but you also wanna recognize them. And we forget to celebrate when we’re in the thick of things. So that’s crucial number one, right? Question number two is what are the things we need to stop doing? Let’s, what is creating noise. What’s distracting us? What, what’s holding us back from achieving this? Like, asking the question across the team, What do you wanna stop doing? And let everyone put their answers down and like, share at the end. You know, so you give everyone speaking rights. , is really critical because there could be things that come up where you’re like, I never even thought that that was still happening. It could be, something that you’re, you’re like, Oh yeah, if we stop that, we could have this much more capacity to work with. You know, So it’s a really great question to ask. And then the, the third thing is, what do you wanna start doing? What should we start doing? Like, what are the things we do have capacity for that we should add, or things that will make this better that we need to start doing? And then the fourth step is to put the actions together to go after as a team and that just that simple exercise. It’s so simple, Johanna, it’s like it blows my mind every time. So much clarity comes out of it. But then you also have actions out of it and everyone’s on the same page. So to me, that brings the a really fast way to get more efficient on how to move forward. especially in a startup environment.

Johanna Buckweitz:
I love that. And in, Yeah, exactly as you said like it’s so simple and it’s so obvious, and I love, like this happens I feel like to me all the time, and so many of my friends who are also entrepreneurs, and I’m sure a lot of you who are listening right now can resonate where someone says something and you’re like, Wow, yeah, that’s so obvious. That’s such a great idea. Why have I not thought about that? Why have I not done. I’m gonna start doing that cuz that is awesome and it’s such a simple, easy thing to apply and I love that you get. This is how then I could take action off of it. Like this is now what I know like I need to do next. And if you kind of know like that, you’re already in a better direction than when you started. So I love that. That is awesome. So for anyone who’s listening who hears, okay, Kareena’s worked with like BlackRock and Groupon and these big name companies, how on earth do you get clients like that? Cause I know so many people like would love to hear from you like. There’s so many of us, like have this dream of working with a certain type of clientele, like whether it’s a smaller company or a bigger company, but especially from the bigger companies. I, I know like a lot of female entrepreneurs feel like they’re so far away, they’re so unapproachable. I can’t even get my foot in the door. Like, you know, maybe if you go on LinkedIn, you might have a mutual connection, but like, that thought doesn’t even first come to mind because it does seem like this big, scary. So far away from me thing.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
Yeah.

Johanna Buckweitz:
How did you even approach deciding that you wanted to work with them? Did they wanna work with you? How did you

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
Yeah.

Johanna Buckweitz:
Go after that? Like, if you could walk us all through how that whole process even worked, that would be awesome.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
Yeah. I mean, I, and I love to share this with people because I kind of feel like it’s an old school way of, of how you do business, which is through your connections, through your network, right? Like it’s getting into the room and talking to people, and it’s been really hard and challenging the last few years. With the pandemic and this hybrid way of working and people not wanting to meet. But I’ll tell you, it’s back in full fledge right now. Like people are meeting, you can set coffee dates, you can set lunch dates, get get back in the room, because every single client I have, have, I have, I currently have had have, et cetera, is referral base. There is only so much that you can accomplish online without connecting and you need to and for the business, like the high, I mean, I’m selling six. Figure contracts, this is not like light work. They need to know you and trust you and be in in the room. so really initially my business was built off, me selling my own time first, my reputation. Is what my business was built off of. And then I was expanded past that based on what I saw within these companies of what else they needed. So literally, I got BlackRock, as a client, I I, my first engagement with them because someone said, you need Kareen. Like, it was literally that type of referral. And I’m so fortunate that I have people. I’ve worked with and have shown my worth to, and who’d see my value and refer me out, you know? And then each client starts to talk about, how’d you get here? Oh, we worked with Kareen, you know, and then another referral comes, et cetera. So, . that’s a big part of, I believe, how you build business. It’s relational. And if we don’t get back into a relational sales versus all the cold, like I I, I can’t even go on LinkedIn half the time because my inbox is all these InMail sales emails. It has nothing to do with why I’m on this platform in the first place. Like, I wanna connect with you, I wanna know what’s going on. I wanna. Set up some time to get to know what your challenges are and figure out like, is there a solve we can have for you. But for me to go out and do cold InMail messages like that, I’ll do it for recruiting when I need good people, but I, I, it’s really, it, I don’t know, it just doesn’t sit well with me lately. I’m, I’m way more relational in how I build my business, and you only need a few, a really, a few really good clients that will stick with you when you continue to bring them value. You know, that’s the other part of it. So not only do you need your strong network, you need to be clear on what your value proposition is and what you’re coming to the table with and a lot of people, I think, also hold back on putting themselves out there is cuz they might not be clear on their messaging on what it is that they’re trying to do. Like what is their service if you can’t explain what your service services, then you know, it’s gonna be a hard time for someone to say yes to you because you’re confusing them. So clarity on what your offer is, or how you add value to them, or how you initiate your engagement and your process through your engagement of working with them is so critical so that when you do have the opportunity to pitch them your services or work with them as a business, or have them buy your product. It’s very clear, it’s value-based, and you now have a stronger relationship with that person to keep buying from you.

Johanna Buckweitz:
There’s so much that you just said that I wanna dive into.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
Yeah.

Johanna Buckweitz:
And I’m super excited about it. so just to that point, like. The that like value piece is crucial. But like you said, the brand messaging is so important because there’s a few cool things that happen when you’re super confident, like in that messaging and it’s super clear. One, like you, feel better talking about it. You’re like, I’ll talk to anybody about my business. Cuz I’m not like, Oh, I do this maybe that like, you know, you’re like, this is what I do, this is why I do it, this is how I can help you. This is the value I add. And then on top of, You also know who you don’t want to work with. It’s really easy to filter it out because it does go both ways. And I think that’s a really important piece that sometimes a lot of us are guilty of forgetting. And I, I, I love what you said too about like, you know, making those connections and those relationships. We have more of those than I think a lot of us realize. When I started my first. . I was like, Maybe I wanna get venture capital funding, but I don’t know anybody who works in in nbc. Absolutely not. Nope, I don’t know anyone. And then I was like, Wait a second, is that actually true? And then I went on LinkedIn, I searched all the companies that I actually wanted to pitch, and I saw I had a lot of mutual connections. Many of which were more than happy to make an introduction and that opens the door. All of a sudden I had access to so many VCs and now I have great relationships with all of them. And it’s like, I like that is not a true statement. What I had said to myself, and I think many of us don’t realize, we have so many connections already, and when you add that value, people wanna refer you and I love that you talked about that because referral business, everybody should be focusing on that. Like a lot of us think like. We have to get more clients in order to grow our revenue. Like that is the number one requirement. That’s the only way it could hit these new targets. No, like you have so many dollars sitting in your inbox currently, like, like in your email list, people that you’ve worked with previously, people that you’ve already started to nurture, people who love you and are more than happy to share how amazing you are and how transformational your service has been with anyone who wants to listen. I know I do that with the people I’ve worked with. I’m like, Let me tell you how great they are. You should hire them now.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
No, you just have to ask though, right?

Johanna Buckweitz:
Yeah,

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
Your Honor, like that, ‘s where the people tend to stop.

Johanna Buckweitz:
Yeah.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
They think you, you, And this is another point I also share in my book, Lead with Value, where it’s like, stop assuming and start asking.

Johanna Buckweitz:
Yeah.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
Like if you just ask, The worst you can get is a no. I don’t know and then great, move on to the next person to ask. You know, the the question again, it’s how you got your VC connections, right? You asked you were like, This is who I wanna meet with, Who do I know? And then you start asking. But if you sit there in an assumption of a doubt that you never asked about, then you truly don’t know the answer. You just don’t.

Johanna Buckweitz:
Yeah.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
And so that is the love what you just shared because that is the number one way to just move forward is start asking, Like, just ask, and even when you don’t know, ask how someone else, if you know someone else who has done it, ask them how they got there, you know, and just hear their journey and be like, Oh, I could do that. You know, like, like I could take that first step, or I could, Yeah, I could try that on and see, which I love. But I was gonna also, you said something else too, with that excitement on the value prop that you bring to the table, like knowing what you’re offering is, if you don’t have that excitement around sharing it with others, it’s probably time for you to exit.

Johanna Buckweitz:
Yeah.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
And and the only reason why I bring that up is that a lot of people don’t give themselves permission to exit from what they’ve built when they’ve outgrow it. , and I think it’s really important to face yourself and say, Hey, I might not be the one to lead this anymore. I’m not passionate about this anymore. Can anyone else come in and replace me? Or do I need to to sell it? Or is it something that, I need to just shut down like I’ve outgrown this. Give yourself that ability to check in if you’re not excited about what you’re doing anymore. because I think that’s another trap that happens where you turn your venture into a J O B and then it doesn’t feel good to be in it anymore, especially if you’re a serial entrepreneur, you know?

Johanna Buckweitz:
Yeah, a hundred percent. And I think many of us also grew up with like, If you exit, you’re quitting, but you’re not, like, I feel like, like all of us have like shifted this mindset like, you know, everyone here who runs their own company, like they’re very much mission-driven, like, and they’re passionate. They love what they do and they’re doing it for a reason. If you are no longer like getting up every single day excited, like I love coffee every single morning, if for some reason, My coffee machine broke and I couldn’t get access to coffee in New York City, which I don’t know how that would happen, but if that would happen, how could I,

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
There’d be a lot of angry New Yorkers.

Johanna Buckweitz:
Oh yeah, there would be a lot of problems in New York, but how could I still be excited for that day with my caffeine withdrawal headache? But like, you need to be excited for your job. You don’t want, like, for the work that you’re doing, you don’t wanna go into it being like, Ugh. I can’t believe I gotta do this again. So it’s important to be able, like you said, to, to realize that and be honest. And if it’s time for you to go another direction, go another direction. Like

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
Yeah.

Johanna Buckweitz:
That is amazing. And, and to your point about the referrals, I think another thing is make it easy. Like, make it super easy for someone to refer you. I was talking to a business owner last week and she shared how she has a referral program, but you know the people who are referring her, they’re not salespeople. They don’t know how to speak the talk. And a lot of us, I, I, that she’s not the first person who shared that with me. Very simple guys. Just give them a one-liner like, Hey, if you, you know, I know you, you love me. Like I, we work together really well. If there’s someone who you know might be interested and you wanna share with them, here’s something you can just send them in an email. Like you could write it for them. Make it simple. They don’t have to think twice about it. They’re happy to then send it. They’re like, Oh, thank God I don’t have to think about another thing and also it’ll help reel that person in to be like, Oh yeah, that sounds good. Cause if they don’t know how to talk about you like you also might not even get that initial call.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
Yeah. And I think also the clarity on who you wanna work with. Like

Johanna Buckweitz:
Yeah.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
Who are your ideal clients and be super clear about that. I’m looking for female entrepreneurs that make over six figures that are trying to scale to seven, that have challenges with hiring people that don’t really know other revenue streams they can bring in to ease the the income during the trend ti like blah, blah, blah, right? Like if you start to explain. Who you want to attract to the people that have worked with you. Then when they meet that person or even sharing the challenges, I love to work with people who have these challenges cuz I know 100% I can help solve them or I have a service that will help them with that. Or I have a product that will meet that need, clarity. Again, like I said, the superpower to the beginning of the top of this conversation. It’s like, it, it is your winning power to lean into for all that you do and then it’s become so much easier. And I love that, that you said give them an email that explains it, something to forward on real easy. I also like to go, just add a link for a 30-minute consult call with you.

Johanna Buckweitz:
Yeah.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
Like you make it super, super easy for whoever is the receiving and understands who you are, what your offer is, and how to connect with you. And, and that’s a great way to build your relational database. But I personally love getting into a room because no one sells your business better than you do,

Johanna Buckweitz:
For sure.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
And so, even if it’s, someone that you really wanna work with, that someone else knows, invite them out to dinner. Like do something that is gracious in how you make your mark with them and just learn more about them and just listen. Listening is the second superpower I have. You didn’t ask me about the second one, but that was the second one.

Johanna Buckweitz:
Oh, that’s a very important one. Cause a lot of people don’t listen. So, I feel like that’s really valuable. I, I take that endeavor a very high consideration. , it’s very important to me. So thank you. So you talked about like this referral piece, right? Like you are really good at what you do and you add a lot of value, which is definitely the the first fundamental thing everyone needs to be thinking of when they’re creating anything. But how did you actually get that first client? Because everything became referral and it snowballs afterward. But that first client, how did that happen?

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
It’s all been referral based, like I, from when I can remember, it’s from working with someone previously who then referred me to someone else who had a similar challenge or a need that they knew I could. Like I, I’m trying to think if I received any clients from a different method. other than that, cuz it has been purely reputation based like it’s been that that’s how, you know, fortunate I am that my clients want to continue to refer me, but also, it’s, it’s truly how I build business. It’s a relational sales model. It, it really is like I don’t pay for ad spend when I built my own personal branding up because people when they land on me, need to understand the credibility behind what I do.

Johanna Buckweitz:
Yeah.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
I did some spend in, in, you know, launching and selling my books and, building reputation around my podcast when that was an active show and, You know, I’m about to go on like a PR run just to, just to, again, reestablish credibility but again, every sale, every close. Like you could generate leads all day. Yeah. But it’s all about how you close the deal, right? And every closed deal I’ve had is because it truly came with a referral, from somebody.

Johanna Buckweitz:
I like that because what you said about the PR too, and like, you know, everything else that you were doing, it does create that level of credibility to you and something really nice for someone to look at. Like, you can be referred by someone who says like, she’s amazing. They’re like, Okay, let me, let me check her out. Let me do my own little research. And they’re like,

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
Everyone does.

Johanna Buckweitz:
Yeah, and it’s like she does all these things. She’s doing this like I’ve seen her here. She’s like, I Googled her and her name’s coming up like all the time on that first page with a lot of different really cool links. It’s like, okay, so not only do I see that but this person who I already trust is saying great things that it’s just like those two things together. Close the deal and then obviously when they talk to you and they see all the value you’re adding, it’s like that’s, you know, a very big important piece as well.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
Well it’s clarity on the offer and like, again, the listening. So whenever I do a sales call, cause this might help your, your listeners as well. I’m just information gathering and I am qualifying my client, my potential client, just as they’re qualifying me because I also don’t say yes to all. I have turned clients away and I’ve also ended relationships with clients that are no longer a fit for the services we provide or outgrown what we do. Like you have to have fluidity. but qualifying your clients is really important because you don’t wanna say yes to anything. That is going to make you either feel like you’re in a crunch to deliver it, feel that ickiness when you have to , like interact with them. Like no one wants to say yes to that and you want your clients to be just as committed to your services as you are to serving them. You know? That to me is an equal exchange, and if that isn’t, validated up front and qualified up front, then it’s an immediately no. Like, it’s just like keep moving. Like, but I don’t think people do that enough. And then they get themselves into hard situations of having to service for money versus servicing for value. The value they bring and the value they get out of the work they get to do for their clients. That, it really can be a catch-20. When you say

Johanna Buckweitz:
Yeah.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
Yes. Or in the opposite of underselling your services, just because someone might not have enough budget, to hire you. I’m not, I we are, I sometimes like to say, I personally, when I’m selling my own time, I’m a luxury item. Like, not everyone can’t afford me. You know, like, because there’s a lot that comes with me and we are gonna move quickly through what it is you need. You won’t need much time with me when I’m when I’m doing my executive coaching or my business advisory. because you, you will be actionable after our time together and it will get a return on that investment cuz we’re generally making sure your money mindset is right.

Johanna Buckweitz:
Yeah.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
But the the value has to be there again. And sometimes underselling myself to work with someone. I do have pro bono work. I do, but, but it’s for a specific thing and for a very short period of time. It’s like a, a specific contain, but it’s really important to know your value and also. the right exchange for that value. So you’re not sitting in bitterness or resentment on the work you said yes to.

Johanna Buckweitz:
No, that, that’s so important. And something that, to your point, a lot of us, I think forget sometimes. And like you are entering into this short or long-term relationship with someone, and you wanna make sure that you’re both aligned and you’re both also gonna enjoy it. Like you’re delivering the value short, but you’re also like trying to have fun and enjoy it and enjoy the process and all of that too. Like your clients need to be aligned in order for you to actually do that. So what does that sales cycle actually look like? So you, you get on that call, and let’s say, you know, you decide the person would be a good fit for you. They have the budget. How do you move forward? Like, it it, do you go back and forth, or is this sales cycle. Fairly short.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
I mean, I would say it’s, first a validation of, yes, I can work with them, I can, I can assist them, and, and provide services for what they’re talking about. And then, moves into proposal phase because I always give options on like how we work together. So when it’s a company like BlackRock, it’s. Okay, you want us to execute X, Y, Z project. I have to propose the budget for it. I have to propose who would be executing against it. I have to make sure there’s timelines, you know, for the deliverable and that it is all agreed to before we go into contract phase to close the deal. So the larger clients who have a higher layering of legal ease and compliance and all the things, like, there’s a whole big process for fulfillment of that sale. But it’s generally first done, with a proposal and an agreement to the proposal because sometimes my clients only want a portion of that. You know, like when I worked with Cherry Creek Mortgage, you know, the the CMO asked me, to do some leadership training for their team and I was like, Great, that’s fine. But why don’t we first come up with what is your team’s brand strategy, like as an internal team of leaders? What’s your brand? Because you’re trying to get a better, recognition internally. So maybe we need to do a brand strategy for your team dynamic and how you start to sell yourselves as a team internally, because it’s really important, especially as a CMO team, to build credibility in house so that they use you the way they need to and provide, and you’re providing the services listening to their needs. Like we created like a mini agency in house basically. So that was one of the items, but then there was also actual coaching for his direct reports and, I brought in another coach trainer for that and had to put the proposal together for him to say yes to. Just to give an example of what, I do when I’m listening. It’s always, again, listening in those sessions, and then it’s breaking down how I think I can meet the need with the budget that they would need. And what our inve, the investment in us is. And then once it’s a yes contracts execution, get it on the schedule and we go.

Johanna Buckweitz:
Awesome. Thank you. So if someone is branding, let’s say a six-figure company, and they’re looking to scale that seven-figure mark, how do you help them? Obviously, each company is gonna be a little bit different, but at least from a general standpoint, how do you help someone in that position accelerate growth? Like what are some of the high-level overview things that you really look at and try to attack head on

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
Now? Is this a company that’s mainly like a solopreneur and trying to hit a seven-figure mark, or is this a small business, you know, So just gimme a little bit of a, give me a, for this case, like what’s the framework? Because there’s a little bit of a different approach when it’s, a single person versus a company with leaders already established.

Johanna Buckweitz:
Okay. Let’s say a solopreneur.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
Okay, so solopreneurs, you know, it’s amazing what you can build these days and earn in order to, build a business but if you are the service, like as a solopreneur, you are selling your own time for money. So you are the service. You really need to realize that there’s a capacity at. You have and how you wanna have a life and run your business in order to service it. So to hit seven figures, that’s 500 an hour, 40 hours a week. Like, know your numbers, you know? So number one is like, you gotta know your numbers to hit a, to hit a financial goal. Do you really wanna work 40 hours a week with your clients, like, and have literally exchanged calls like every day, eight hours a day in order to hit seven figures? Probably not. That’s probably not why you went into working for yourself. So what could you do? What are the services you provide for your clients? So this is how I went from six-figure thinking. To seven-figure building was, I looked at the fact that I was selling, I was exactly this person I’m describing to you. I was, I started as a solopreneur first, and I would sell my time for money, sell my expertise, get in and out of the companies I worked with and then I realized, I’m like, I keep seeing gaps that my, these companies also need in addition to me or, or we go and we build something and now they need these other people to come in and continue to execute. And I was. I can bring in those resources. So when I sat and thought about building a seven-figure business, it was, and not on my own time. Like I did not wanna work 40 hours a week and I haven’t worked 40 hours a week since I don’t know now 12 years. But it’s something that I, realized if I just talked to my clients and said, What else? Like, what else do you need support with? And I found a way to source it through my firm to them by bringing in the other experts and earning margin off their time, then it’s way less work for me. All I’m doing is selling and, and have oversight on the deliverable. And I was able to hit seven figures in less than a year in, in a service-based consultancy because of that simple model. It’s not all. go higher for what the gaps are and then figure out the right sales model or the right price point to earn some margin off your team’s time when they’re implementation. So that’s for consultancy when it, there’s other products and services you’re trying to build and launch. It’s really understanding your revenue tracks and what else do your clients need. Again, it’s the same question. It’s like, what else do your clients need? And is that something you wanna fulfill in your business but most of the struggle happens. I’d say for, so solopreneurship is when it gets too big for you to manage on your own, and you’re afraid to go hire other people to fill in the gaps. That’s an inefficient way to run a business. And honestly, you can’t scale because if anything happens to you, and I’ve had this happen, or I’ve had health issues and challenges where I was out of pocket and then stressed, like, where’s the money gonna come in from? Because if I’m not doing the work, who, how am I earning? , Right. And I was very fortunate with the last two challenges I had health-wise, that my business was running itself and I still was making a great seven-figure revenue stream into the business and my team was taking care of financially and I was also taking care of financially and it withstood those challenges. So you have to think about those things to scale past, you know, yourself and the limitations you put on your earning. By wanting, wanting to do it all.

Johanna Buckweitz:
When it comes to actually hiring that team. Like I, I love that you mentioned that because this is a topic that’s come up a lot with, you know, so many members of our community and so many entrepreneurs in general who have, have shared this with me, that there’s a lot of fear around hiring and around firing. So it’s like how to hire the right people. How to also make sure once they are hired, you are able to measure performance and if for some reason it’s not the right fit. Like how do you kind of create either a performance plan or let them go? And so I think so many people are afraid to start outsourcing, afraid to start hiring because they don’t wanna be spending this money on people who are going to underperform. How do you try to make sure to the best of your ability from the outset that you are hiring the right team?

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
Okay, so first off, it’s to know exactly what you’re having them come in to do and being super clear on that initial initiative. So let’s just say you, for me, it was like, Ugh, I just need someone to manage contracts and the accounting side and running the invoices, right? And I had tried different ways, like it’s trial and error. I always start with contract-based work before I even think about bringing an employee into my company, The reason being too is my business is trend based, so I don’t always have the same amount of revenue stream monthly to feel confident that if I had a full employee salary based folk like on my team, that I wouldn’t be stressing out, so I’m comfortable personally. With contracted services that are very clear on what that service is that they’re providing me and how they will work with me and how I will measure their performance, but all of that has to be set up front. So, and you just asked all those questions, so. Two higher. Number one, it’s really being clear on what you’re bringing them in for and how you plan to onboard them to your processes. Do not assume they know what the heck they’re doing if you don’t show them. So you have to take time and show them. Exactly what it is that is a successful way of doing what you’re bringing them in for. And I know that’s hard. It’s so challenging to find time to show someone how to do a job that you no longer wanna do, but you need to, and then still do your job on top of it eventually. It’s taken off your plate. Then as they are performing in it, as soon as there’s a fracture, like a, a, like a, a moment of dissatisfaction, let’s call it, or ugh, like I wish it was different. , say it. Do you not hold onto it for too long? Don’t assume they’re gonna eventually get it if you don’t. Talk to them in the moment. Be like, Thank you for delivering these things and this is the best way to give feedback. Always share one or two things that you appreciate that they did correctly and then share the thing that you need them to improve upon and say for the next time, I really need you to improve upon this. I really need to make sure that you’re not talking as much when we meet because my time is limited. So please, let’s just focus on the work we need to do, and let’s just have catch time over coffee Fridays at 9:30, like set the container, you are leading your business. Right, and so it’s, again, it’s shining into a leadership stance as to what it needs. There are a lot of people that move into solopreneurship cuz they want total control and a control freak is not someone who is very self-aware on how they show up in a leadership setting. Like you, if you’re struggling with this, like let letting the reins go because you must have it a certain way. Then I would do a show and tell with that person, meaning, And the interview process somewhat of a case study on how they would handle something before even hiring them. So use case studies to also vet them on, on how they would perform for you. Especially when it comes to like content writers or any sort of design work, you can give them a really short case study on, you know, I need this post done. This is the language, or this is the concept, here’s the brand voice. Like, show me, show me before I hire you is a completely valid thing to, challenge someone with before you hire them, but you wanna make sure that it’s a fit and then I meet with anybody new. I bring on to my team. I meet with them weekly because, for 30 minutes, because I want consistency for them to be able to bring the issues they have to me, but also for me to give them feedback if I’m having issues with them. So it’s a, it is a mutual space for us to just keep the enhanced efficiency between us, and then when it goes awry and it’s time to let that person go or end that service. And that’s again, why I like contracted services is that it’s determination agreement is already in the contract. You know?

Johanna Buckweitz:
Yeah.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
You just have to give that notice or you just have to say Thank you, goodbye. Whatever that looks like, is something that do what you’re comfortable with, you know? But even for employment, even when you bring someone on, If you’re in an at-will state, you really have the right to let them go when you need to let them go. It’s not the intention, cuz it does cost your business to bring on employees. So think about contract to hire for a while. And try ’em out before you make them permanent.

Johanna Buckweitz:
How do you then navigate that gap between if you have to let someone go to when you, let’s say, hire their replacement or hire like a new contracted employee, Like how would that work? You know, do you have to redistribute that work to other members of your team, to yourself for at least a, a specific period of time?

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
Yeah. I mean, you’ll know pretty quickly when someone’s not. You know, And in that, you’re probably already, I mean, I definitely have started searches while I was also planning someone’s exit. Like it’s just part of, Yeah, being ahead of the curb for your own business. It’s your business container. You are the one running it. You’re setting the tone for how things need to operate and what is acceptable and what’s not, you know? So in parallel, yes. Sometimes it’s picking up the pieces and stretching myself to do certain things that I wish we’re delegated, but I just don’t have the right people yet, while I’m looking for the replacement, or sometimes it’s to shelve a project, sometimes I’ll put things on pause if it’s not that critical and just let it be like literally the social media marketing is the bane of my existence. And so like truly, truly, and I don’t, can’t even tell you how many people I have tried to hire to take care of it for me, and this is more on my personal branding side of things cuz I don’t really need to do much. I don’t do much marketing on the social front other than LinkedIn posts for my business. But I, I realize. I am just against the actual system itself. So anything that’s done for me in that system triggers me to no end. So why would I continue? But I, I literally tried, I was like, Well, but this is the trend. I gotta try. I gotta, you know, see how I can build my list and my followership and all these things, right? And every service I hired has felt like a complete disappointment, and so I just shelved it because it wasn’t actually driving me business, it was driving me crazy. So I had to let it go, and now I’m like, I’m on socials for fun.

Johanna Buckweitz:
Yeah.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
Because it’s a fun outlet for me, and I share tips, and I, you know, I share my life here in construction, like all the things, because I want that personal connection. Again, I’m a relational salesperson, so you need to know that I understand the pains when you’re talking about the pains. I’m living them too, but also the celebrations and the fun, right? But that’s an example of where I tried, I tried bringing on services. I tried bringing on VAs that would do it. I tried like, it was just, it’s just painful. Doesn’t work for me, and so I had to shelve it, and that’s okay too. If it doesn’t have a direct return on investment for your business model, shelve it for a while. You know, don’t keep paying for it if it’s not bringing you value.

Johanna Buckweitz:
Yeah, no, a hundred percent. And I like that you did that too. Cause you realize like, this is not fun. I’m not enjoying this, this is also not helping me. And like you said, it was driving you crazy, so you’re like at it, not worth that.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
Yeah.

Johanna Buckweitz:
Like done.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
Yeah. You gotta remove the, Those are obstacles, right? And I take your energy away from the things that you’re meant to be focused. I’d rather be in a room with the C-suite that I’m helping guide on what to do next in their business than dealing with like, what should this post be? And is this in my brand voice? And

Johanna Buckweitz:
Yeah. And I mean, I think people also generally can sense something is like kind of funky, like when you have that energy, especially going into posting and social media like it’s not gonna resonate. So like by default it’s not gonna work.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
Right? Right. Yeah.

Johanna Buckweitz:
I also liked what you said a lot about like the case studies for employees.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
Yeah.

Johanna Buckweitz:
Like even like in finance, like if you used to work in corporate finance like you had to take an Excel test or you would have to build like a cost-benefit analysis. Like nobody trusted that you could do that by yourself. Like they’re gonna be like here at an interview. Here you go. Case study, like figure it out. You got 20 minutes on the. Go.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
Yeah. And, and sometimes it’s something as simple as, show me your approach.

Johanna Buckweitz:
Yeah.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
You know, it’s, it doesn’t have to be, something to build, but it’s like something, your approach like they wanna, you wanna see how they think. Yep. And you wanna see how they write. Cuz if they’re representing your business, you wanna make sure that they have the the wherewithal to write clearly, unfortunately, younger generations now write in like text code and it’s like, Well, where’s the grammar? You know, , It’s like just traditional learning that I thought was like standard.

Johanna Buckweitz:
Yeah.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
You know, to interact with you, you really need to check. You need to check, you know, see what.

Johanna Buckweitz:
Yeah.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
What works best for you and is aligned with your brand and your business values like that’s the number one thing. And it, and it’s really good to set the boundaries up front.

Johanna Buckweitz:
A hundred percent. No, I agree. And I think like for me, everyone is listening. The last piece that I would say about this is also like when you’re hiring, be super clear about what it is you need. And don’t also assume that people can read your mind like what you think is common sense. Even you just pointed it out, right? What you thought everybody would know about writing. Apparently not, right? Like a lot of things we were just like, Well, that’s obvious. Everybody would know that. It’s like, no, not really. So like, Sometimes it’s super annoying to be as hyper-detailed as possible. Like when creating even just like a job posting or, or just, you know, when you’re even having that conversation with like a prospect, like, this is what you need to be super clear on. Cuz this is what I expect up front and this way. Like, there’s no miscommunication, there’s not gonna be no friction. Everybody understands what the expectations are immediate.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
Yeah. And just, and follow up with it in writing, you know?

Johanna Buckweitz:
Yeah.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
Like, build the policies that make sense for your company, because then that’s what you point out. Especially if you, you know, employment law is a whole nother thing when you have to d terminate someone who is employed. and you wanna make sure that your ducks are in a row on like, Well, we explain to you that this was our policy and now there’s a breach of policy, which is why you’re being terminated. You know, like makes it so much easier to build that transition when you are clear on the boundaries that you want people to work within, as well as the guidelines of what represents your business and your brand. It’s just easier. It’s easier to then take action when it’s out of line.

Johanna Buckweitz:
A hundred percent, so switching gears a little bit, you are also an investor in Drink Light Pink, which is a female-founded and funded beverage company, which I think is awesome.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
Yeah.

Johanna Buckweitz:
So for anyone who is interested and also investing in startups, like what are some important things to be mindful of, like, or look out for before you invest in a company?

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
I mean, it’s when it’s at the state, like drink light pink is hopefully, hopefully, we’re crossing our fingers. It will be launched this fall. it’s something that I got into because I know the founder really well, and the founders are, when you’re at that stage, when it, you know, early seed precede, range of, investing is to make sure that. You really understand their business model, believe in their business model, but then also know that the founders will execute against it. Like that’s number one because it’s very easy to get caught up in a pitch of the potential of something.

Johanna Buckweitz:
Yeah.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
But it’s all about the execution of something. When you’re investing because you want your money back, you wanna earn off of that. Not only do you wanna show your belief in that person, but you also want the return, you know, investing in someone else’s business while you’re still building your own. Has its own weight to it. And so, that’s what I look for. I look at the founders and I wanna make sure the founders have the credibility and the stamina to launch what they’re launching. and what I love about Lori, Lori Harder is the founder of Drink Light Pink, is that she is someone who has mastery in gardening audience, mastery in thought leadership. She’s someone who, whenever she shares any product that she uses, that’s not even hers, like people are buying it. So she has influence. And I was, you know, it was one of those things where her mission for drink light pink goes even further. Because it’s gonna be all about women investing in women. She’s using the drink as a platform for connection, so she’s doing really cool things with the cans. And then also she’s gonna take funds from how the business earns to then create investment funds for women-owned businesses. So it has the heart that I look for. In businesses to invest in and wanted to be at the forefront of her mission because I, I think it’s a movement. And so that’s why I decided to invest in her company. and it’s also cuz I believe she is so compassionate, passionate, and compassionate that, I know she’s gonna follow through. So

Johanna Buckweitz:
that’s pretty cool.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
That’s what I look for and invest in to invest in someone else’s business. Yeah,.

Johanna Buckweitz:
I mean I think all those things are super important and also that company sell. Awesome. I’m definitely going to check it out and I hope everyone listening Will too, cuz that sounds incredible. Like once it’s live, I think all of us will be

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
Yeah.

Johanna Buckweitz:
On board there. so with like the the companies that you do work with, do you ever help them get investment funding? Is that part of your process?

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
What I’ve done is helped with how they position themselves and their confidence in going after the money. I don’t think I have had a connection of a closed-like deal in investing by referring, one of my clients to the investors that I know. but what I have done as a coach and advisor is like assist them with their confidence on that pitch and making sure that they are able to be really clear what they’re ask. So, because that is the most important part I believe when you’re pitching, is to know what you’re asking for and be super clear about it in order to get it. but I don’t think I’ve yet to. See a deal happen where who I’ve introduced to each other that an investment has been made. Not yet.

Johanna Buckweitz:
Yeah.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
I’m sure it’ll happen.

Johanna Buckweitz:
The content is really important, right? Like, like you said like you have to be able to know what to ask because also a lot of the times you’re not just asking for money, you’re asking for help, at least for you. So like in this company that you invested in, are you providing things as well other than just obviously the financial component? Because that’s a lot of the times what people look for.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
Yeah. So what’s awesome about what would drink like pink? I think there are 52 of us female investors in the group that initiated with Lori. I think it was, I think the number was 52. And what’s great about Lori is that she does bring us together periodically on how best to support her. In the launch, but also with the follow-on, impact she wants to have. So yes, there will be a lot of that as part of being an investor, because we wanna stand behind the brand we’re invested in. and it’s the first all-female funded, beverage company. I think that in this manner of this type of investing that has been established. so we want to be able to tell those stories and help more women invest in each other. I also just joined another community called Rain and Co, which is also all about, women helping women, invest better, like learn what other opportunities, what are the other businesses. And that’s Kara, a Alia. And she’s an amazing, business founder also. Loves to help women invest in other types of businesses too. So it’s more about the learning and the broadening your, your horizon. It’s like what is out there? Cuz you wanna create revenue streams or passive income, based on things you believe in. But if you don’t expose yourself to it, it’s.

Johanna Buckweitz:
You won’t know.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
It’s challenging. Yeah. You just won’t know. And so I’m loving that these amazing women in my network are also launching platforms just like yours. You know, like you’re entrepreneurial women platform is something, that’s going to be so impactful. Like it’s, it’s just needed and I think it’s beautiful cuz you’ll gain when you’re ready if you need female investors to help you take it to the next level. Again, it’s getting clear on that ask and like, what is, what is the level of sponsorship you want in order to have it happen and have the impact you wanna. Take it wherever you wanna go.

Johanna Buckweitz:
Yeah, no, a hundred percent. Thank you for that. Yeah. So you, you, you wrote a book, one that you mentioned, earlier.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
Yeah.

Johanna Buckweitz:
As we were chatting, and I think you wrote another one as well, and you had a podcast. You mentioned. What inspired you to create all those things?

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
Well the same year that I hit seven figures in my business was the same year I chartered a goal to write my first book and it was pretty wild to like do them simultaneously. but that was be a badass Six Tools to uplevel your Life. Like that was the first book that I wrote and published, and it was mainly for just a personal challenge initially, like, can, am I even capable of writing and publishing a book? Like you talk about people talk about things, I’m someone that talks and acts on it.

Johanna Buckweitz:
Yeah.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
If it means something to me. Right. and so that book, it was just a funny story cuz in that year that it took me to launch that book, the first half of the year I wrote a 250-page book that I threw in the trash because it was so bad. You know, like, I was like, literally I would read it, I get back from the editor and I’m like, Who cares? This is horrible. Like, I would never read this, you know? And I literally was like, forget it and then it came to me that the books I like to write are impact-based books where you walk away with something as a reader like you get tools, you get things to do because that’s the type of reader I am. Like there’s not many times where I’m just sitting to read just to read.

Johanna Buckweitz:
Yeah.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
Unless it’s probably like a spiritual book or some way to connect better with myself. Like I get into those books or storytelling. But what I was thinking about this book and I was like, no. Like if I’m gonna share a story, I also have to share like something of impact someone can walk away with. It can’t just be about me. So then I ended up writing, writing the version that it was, probably in like eight weeks, and got that version published. So that is the version that is out in, in there in the world that I thought this one, the second book, was a challenge to, from one of my, coach mentors that I was working with at the time where he had said, you know, why don’t you write a book that helps you, helps other people know the business you do, like share the case study, share the work you do, and what, what centers you and why it’s such a, an attraction to work with you. Like you enter a room Kareen and like you, that room is left with so much value, like you don’t know how to turn it off. So the book is called Lead with Value. Because it’s all about how I approach business. And it has to do with also the relationship building and how you figure out what is your personal value system, How do you have an exchange with someone else? So, and that has all the tools to help you become a stronger leader and also facilitate these type of activities that I shared with you earlier. that’s in the Lead with Value book. And then the podcast was cuz I felt. , unless you have a conversation with me, you probably don’t really get me, you know, like, you know, And I was like, how can I launch something? And I launched that back in, 2018. And it was live until summer of 2020, I think. Cuz I just was getting, It was hard during the pandemic to keep it up.

Johanna Buckweitz:
Yeah.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
But it was an interview series, had coaching, calls on it. Like, it was just so much fun. I learned so much from my guests and I, It’s called Your Badass Journey and the, the show is still live. Like you can get all the value you want out of the show. I just felt like a new show was brewing in me and that’s what I wanna launch.

Johanna Buckweitz:
That’s awesome. Well, first of all, the title is incredible and I’m excited for whatever you launch next cuz I know it is going to be epic and of course, add a ton of value. .

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
Of course. And I’ll have you on as a guest once I, once I do launch it, because it’s, it’s brewing, it’s gotta come out soon. Yeah.

Johanna Buckweitz:
I like it. Well, I’m excited to see it. So you have done so much and you continue to do so. What’s next for you? Like what is the, the big vision?

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
So I’ve been, finally integrating like all of me into all that I do, because that’s what I help other people do. But I’m really, really lately fascinated with how we can bring what I would call like healing modalities into business because I think that there’s been so much trauma created in, in building business, like whether you’re in a corporate environment that’s large or even starting a business, there’s this tension and trauma that can occur and you don’t even realize. You know, I do think we face microtraumas every day. and so this next. platform that I plan to launch is to help, you know, integrate the care that you need to manage through those type of traumas or any kind of discomfort you’re having or not sure how to navigate, how to get to the next level, whatever that looks like is part of the vision. So it’s a bit of, conversational, obviously leading it as a thought leader for it. And then, hopefully building a tech platform that will allow it to get to people with ease. So that’s the vision for the future.

Johanna Buckweitz:
I love that.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
Yeah.

Johanna Buckweitz:
What does success currently mean to you?

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
Success to me is being able to stand in the truth of who I am in all that I do, and allow it to show up in the bank. To show up in my relationships, to show up well in my health and, and allow me to continue to grow in all that I do. Like, That’s success. It’s not about the things or the material side of things. It’s, it’s really about that alignment.

Johanna Buckweitz:
Yeah.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
From the inside out.

Johanna Buckweitz:
I love that. So anyone who’s listening who is officially a fan and wants more of you, how can they find you?

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
You’re so sweet. so kareenwalsh.com is where you find everything. It’s K A R E E N W A L S H, and it is all things me. I think I’m gonna be doing a, a site refresh soon, but you can, if you go to slash links those are where all my downloadables are. So if you want any of my workbooks, if you want that retrospective exercise we talked about, like you can grab it there. If you wanna book time with me, you can book time there, but it’s kareenwalsh.com/links. And then you wanna follow me And the crazy life I lead, I do share that on Instagram my morning rituals. Construction in my house and sometimes the tips on how to just be more aligned daily and your business and yourself, and then LinkedIn of course is a great connection for me. Just don’t InMail me some sales message because you will not get a response, so don’t be surprised. But if you wanna connect with me and tell me what you got out of this conversation with Johanna. I’ll be responding to you.

Johanna Buckweitz:
Oh my gosh. Yeah, we got like, there’s way too many things in your LinkedIn inbox. Like, people gotta know that if I know , Oh my gosh. How can we as a community support you?

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
I mean, I, you know, this is just great to be able to support you. I like to, I like to come and bring value to all of you, so if you wanna stay in the know about what’s going on. You know, download one of the things I I give away or just add yourself to my list so that I can keep you in the know of what’s happening next. And, yeah, I just really appreciate that there isn’t anything immediate. but just connecting in that way. Like I said, I’m relational. So I’d like to get to know more about you guys and hopefully, continue to share more about me and we both inspire each other.

Johanna Buckweitz:
Thank you for that. You have dropped so many bombs of wisdom on all of us today, and I am so grateful for that. But last but not least, before you leave, could you share some words of wisdom that would fit on a tweet?

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
I would love to say don’t let the limitations of others become your own. Keep dreaming big and that dream is meant for you. Go after it. Yeah.

Johanna Buckweitz:
I love that. I, That is beautiful. Thank you so much, Kareen, for coming on today.

Kareen Zahr Walsh:
Thank you for having me, Johanna.

Johanna Buckweitz:
We hope you enjoyed hearing from the incredible Kareen Zahr Walsh, and if you did, please leave us a review on Apple, Spotify, or wherever you tune in to. Listen. Please share this episode with anyone who you think might enjoy it. Thank you so much for tuning in to this week’s episode of Limitless. See you next week for a new episode.

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